Carmen  Dorris
Carmen (Dermer) Lehnert Dorris was born on April 5, 1936, and died on April 5, 2019, at her home in Stillwater. Memorial services will be held at the Unitarian-Universalist Church on Saturday, September 14, at 2:00 PM.

Carmen, the daughter of Otis and Vern (Hughes) Dermer, was born and raised in Stillwater. As an Air Force wife of Richard (Dick) Lehnert, Carmen had the opportunity to live in many places, including Texas, Japan, Tennessee, California, and Florida. She earned her master's degree in psychology, taught public school in Red Rock and in Stillwater, and had the distinction to be selected "Teacher of the Year." Carmen had an abiding love of music and literature, including poetry. She loved sharing and learning new jokes.

Preserving and protecting the environment was very important to Carmen. She and her second husband, Troy Dorris, helped establish Walden Hill, west of Stillwater, as a place to celebrate nature and live in harmony with it. Carmen valiantly protected a large, old tree destined to be removed near the hospital. Wildflowers, shrubs and trees at Carmen's house and nearby were a testament to her commitment to plants. Her dogs and cats were also an important part of her life.

Carmen was predeceased by her parents; her first husband, Dick Lehnert; her second husband, Troy Dorris; her son, Chris Lehnert and her brother Richard Dermer.

She is survived by her daughters Heather Atkinson (Richard), and Lenore Kendrick; sister, V. A. Ospovat (Naaman); sister-in-law, Marti Dermer; four grandchildren, one great-grandchild, many nieces, nephews and special friends.

Condolences may be emailed to the family, and an online obituary may be viewed at www.strodefh.com.
Published on August 29, 2019

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